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Covid-19 Veterinary Update

Covid-19 Our Veterinary Practice –  The second “new normal”

It seems likely that in the next two or maybe three weeks the COVID hazard level will come down to Level 3, and lockdown will be released a little bit more. So how is this going to affect how we see your pets without compromising the safety of staff, owners or pets? We don’t want to be responsible for any rise in the R value!

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Covid-19 Cats and Dogs

Covid-19 affecting my cat or dog?

After a recent article by the BBC, regarding Covid-19 and keeping your cats indoors, the British Veterinary Association has now clarified their position in light of the report.
In response to questions from the BBC about general advice for pet owners the British Veterinary Association had given both general guidance and specific advice for cat owners regarding households who were self-isolating or infected households.

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The importance of Dental X-ray images for Dogs & cats

 

Why we take dental x-ray images of dog and cat teeth

Many times when you go to your own dentist for a check-up they will want to take some dental x-ray images of your teeth. Commonly this will be to assess for caries or previous fillings. Caries are the main cause of fillings in people, and dogs and cats rarely suffer from caries, so why do we take radiographs of dog and cat teeth?

Fireworks & Pets

Fireworks and pets

Fireworks and pets dealing with anxiety

As Guy Fawkes night approaches, the lead up to November 5th see fireworks being off earlier each year. Unfortunately a lot of pets suffer with anxiety during this period.

Fireworks season is one of the loudest times of the year for our pets, therefore it’s important we don’t forget about them. Although the flashes and loud bangs maybe exciting for both children and adults for pets this can be very frightening.

Fireworks can be a terrifying experience and cause our pets to act unpredictably which can put their safety and the safety of others at risk. It is therefore very important to help keep our pets safe to avoid them escaping or turning aggressive through fear.

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Dogs in hot cars

Many people still think that leaving dogs in hot cars in a shaded spot with the windows open is fine, however, the truth is it can be very dangerous. The inside of a car can heat up very quickly, according to the RSPCA. It may be  22oC outside but in a car it can reach 47 oC within an hour.

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Vaccinations Kennel Cough

The importance of Vaccinations for Kennel Cough

Kennel cough is a term used to describe a contagious infectious cough affecting dogs. It is most commonly caused by Bordetella bronchiseptica bacteria and /or canine parainfluenza virus, although many other viruses, bacteria and mycoplasmas have occasionally been implicated in outbreaks.

A few of the infections which can cause kennel cough symptoms are included in your dog’s annual vaccinations. These infections are canine distemper, canine adenovirus type two and canine parainfluenza.

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AFTER BREXIT PET TRAVEL TO EUROPE

After Brexit Pet Travel

Travelling after Brexit to Europe with your pet.  Dogs, cats and ferrets have been able to travel to the EU on the basis of a Pet Passport for many years now. The effect of Brexit on pet travel is currently unknown but there are three possible scenarios. Of most impact is the effect of a No Deal Brexit as this has implications if you wish to take your pet to an EU country on or shortly after the 30th March 2019.

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Pet Anxiety

Pet anxiety helping your pet on bonfire night

Firework associated anxiety can be very traumatic for animals.  November 5th and the weekends around it are some of the noisiest nights in the year and this can make this time of year especially difficult for animals. Therefore it is important that pet owners don’t forget about their animals. Flashes and loud noises maybe exciting for humans but it can be very frightening for pets.

Furthermore, the loud noises can cause our pets to behave unpredictably putting their safety and others at risk. As a dog, cat or rabbit owner, you should plan ahead to ensure your animals feel safe and to help avoid any incidents of them becoming aggressive, fearful or running away.

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Seasonal Canine Illness

What is seasonal canine illness?

Seasonal canine illness (SCI) is a very serious and potentially life-threatening illness.  It generally affects dogs which have been walked in woodland areas 1 – 3 days prior to becoming unwell.

Seasonal canine illness was first found back in 2009 in dogs which had been walked at the Sandringham Estate in Norfolk. Shortly afterwards dogs which had been walked in Thetford, Sherwood and Rendlesham Forest and Clumber Park were also reported to have shown similar signs of seasonal canine illness.

Generally, cases of the illness are seen between the months of August through to November, with the highest figures in September.